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Things to consider when rehoming or adopting a new kitten

Updated: Feb 14

It is hard to resist the cuteness of adorable kittens we see on selling sites or at rehoming centres. However, the reality of owning a kitten sets in soon after bringing them home – cleaning litter trays, replacing torn curtains, and even discovering surprises in unexpected places like potted plants. Consider the costs associated with kitten care, including bedding, food, toys, veterinary bills, flea and worm treatments as these soon add up. This adorable little ball of fur can turn into a significant financial commitment, considering they may be with you for up to 20 years.


Think hard if your really want a cat or kitten

Before taking that leap and bringing a kitten home, it’s crucial to think long-term and evaluate if you genuinely want this cat. Ask yourself if your lifestyle can accommodate such a commitment. Many unfortunate cats end up in rescue centres or abandoned on the streets due to hasty decisions. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to think carefully before making the decision to bring a kitten home. Maybe consider visiting a rescue centre instead, where you can explore the option of adopting an older cat.

Do you really want a kitten?

While you might miss out on the initial cuteness of a kitten, a mature cat has already passed the stage of destroying curtains, and they typically don’t require a litter box as they can use the outdoors. By adopting a rescue cat, you can benefit from the assurance that the cat has undergone health checks, been neutered, and had its temperament assessed. Reach out to your local rescue centre, share your preferences, and let them guide you in finding your ideal cat – your kitty could be patiently waiting for a forever home in a rescue centre at this very moment.


Do you really want a kitten?

Are you ready for commitment?

Bringing a cat into your life is a significant and long-term commitment. It’s vital to ask yourself if you are genuinely ready for this commitment and if your lifestyle fits in with the needs of a cat.


Would you be better with an older cat?

Choosing to adopt from a rescue centre presents many benefits. Rather than succumbing to impulse purchases or supporting questionable breeders, rescue adoption offers a chance to provide a loving home for a cat in need. By opting for an older cat, you bypass the mischievous phase and the associated challenges of raising a kitten. Instead, you welcome a mature and well-behaved cat into your life. Not only does this spare your curtains and eliminate the need for litter boxes, but it also simplifies your daily routine while providing a safe haven for a cat that deserves a second chance.


Would an older cat suit your better?

Visit your local rescue centre

When you adopt a cat from a rescue centre, you are saving a life. These centres provide health checks and well-being of each of these cats. Each cat goes through thorough health checks, receives necessary medical treatments, and undergoes neutering or spaying to prevent future health issues. Temperament of rescue cats is assessed, enabling the rescue centre to match you with a cat that suits your family and lifestyle. By choosing a rescue cat, you not only gain a loving companion but also experience the joy of giving a neglected or abandoned animal a chance at happiness.


Take your time when choosing a cat or kitten

Choosing a cat should never be a hasty decision. Instead of falling for impulsive buys or contributing to the plight of abandoned cats, it’s important to carefully consider the long-term commitment to the cat . Rescue adoption offers a compassionate and responsible alternative, allowing you to provide a loving home to a cat in need. By welcoming an older cat into your life, you can bypass the challenges of kittenhood while forming a deep bond with a mature cat. Take the time to visit a rescue centre, speak with the staff, and find the cat that fits in with your lifestyle. Never rush into getting a cat or kitten, the right cat will come along for you.


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